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TOPIC: Pump Piping

Pump Piping 4 years 7 months ago #8799

  • Anton
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All,

I want to try a little experiment.

I'm looking to put together an article for the Tips, Tools & Training area of the site, but I want to try a different approach .... I'd like to "crowd source" an article.



The Idea is that I suggest the title, such as "Pump Piping" above.
You then jump in with your thoughts - they can be very broad, or very specific to a part of the pump piping topic.
  • Do / Don't lists
  • Suction / Discharge
  • By Pass
  • Reducers
  • Valving
  • Etc.
The idea being that we use this thread to debate and comment on the various aspects of pump piping, drawing on the combined experiences of pipers using the forum (which must total thousands of years!).

I'd love to see plenty of input, and hopefully, if it works well, we'll do it for other articles.

OK?

Pump Piping .... GO!
- If you're the smartest person in the room ... you're in the wrong room.
Last Edit: 4 years 7 months ago by Anton.

Pump Piping 4 years 7 months ago #8800

  • Jop
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Anton,
This is very good idea, So here are my first thoughts:

- Do: Make your Pump Piping fit the specifics of the situation. This means the type of pump, the commodity, the type of plant, type of project (Green Field or Brown Field) the piping Code for the project, the material, and all the other aspects of the installation.
- Don't: Don't assume that one answer fits all pump types.
- Suction: Avoid pockets, high point pockets and low point pockets.
- Discharge: Route piping to allow good access for operation and maintenance.
- By Pass: Not all pumps have a bypass line.
- Reducers: Consider the size, type, location and orientation.
- Valving: Valves in pump suction and discharge lines are there for isolation when the pump needs service. They are NOT for throttling the flow.
Do it once and Do it Right
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Pump Piping 4 years 7 months ago #8804

  • Cowtown
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New here, but really like it!

I like the comments JOP.

Piping on pumps,

Do:
Suction reducer FOT - if service is liquid.
Suction reducer FOB - if service is slurry
Suction reducer FOB - if service is liquid, and the source is from above (trapped air should entrain back up the feed piping)
If you put an isolating valve on the discharge side, specify LO - locked open
Put a check valve on the discharge line.
Check straight length requirements for the suction.
Support the pipe properly.

Don't:
Run piping over the motor - it needs to be pulled out for service & maintenance, usually by crane.
Last Edit: 4 years 7 months ago by Jop. Reason: Minor spelling and puncuation issues.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Anton

Pump Piping 4 years 7 months ago #8805

  • 11echo
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"IF" the pump suction and discharge are either 125# or 250# the pump is cast iron, and whether it's listed or not, the pump nozzles are "flat faced"! To connect to it with steel spec piping you need to get 150# or 300# flanges with a FLAT FACE (where the raised face is machined off, creating a "flat face flange"). You will also need a full face gasket, spiral wound stainless steel gaskets won't work and WILL create the same problem as using a raised face flange, if one is used!
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Pump Piping 4 years 7 months ago #8814

  • Anton
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We are still looking for comments on this article, so if you have something you would like to add on the subject, login and have your say!
- If you're the smartest person in the room ... you're in the wrong room.

Pump Piping 4 years 7 months ago #8815

  • tstorzuk
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Suction strainers.

The proper way to install them, pointing the opposite direction of the flow. This makes sure that any debris is pushed to the outside edges of the flow stream instead of the middle of the flow stream where it could make bubbles/cavitation.

Supports.

Have supports as close to the pump nozzles as possible so that the least amount of pressure is transferred to the pump nozzles
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