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TOPIC: piping standards in Singapore

11 years 4 months ago #7334

  • Anton
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Hi all,

This is what seems like a very basic question, but I'm havin trouble findng a good answer.

We are working on a job in Singapore, and our piping material specs are PIP standard, usin ASME B31.3.

I hve been asked ... why are we using ASME?



I found it dfficult to answer othe than, "because we can".

For process piping applications, are asme fitting th best toselect fo Singapore, or are EN standards more appropriate for this region.

Thanks for yor help guys.
- If you're the smartest person in the room ... you're in the wrong room.

In my opinion this is 11 years 4 months ago #4650

  • Jop
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In my opinion this is an issue for the Project's Owner/Client.
They should have stipulated in their invitation to bid what the criteria for the project would be, including the applicable piping code.
Do it once and Do it Right

I agree, but ... They didn't 11 years 4 months ago #4651

  • Anton
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I agree, but ...

They didn't stipulate a piping code, and now that we have developed specs, they are asking the question.

All I need to be able to confirm / state, is that these codes are the most applicable for Singapore.

I know they are used (along with others), but can't seem to find a reason to say they are the best, other than that they are available world wide and offer a wider selection of materials than any other standard.

..... one of those days!!!
- If you're the smartest person in the room ... you're in the wrong room.

Based on the following it 11 years 4 months ago #4652

  • Jop
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Based on the following it sounds as thou ASME-SG is "THE" recognized code organization for Singapore.

History of ASME-SG



The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) was founded in 1880. It quickly became the major technical and educational organization representing mechanical engineers in the United States. Today, ASME is an international organization boasting a worldwide membership of 125,000 engineers.

The technical base upon which the ASME rests is its Technical Groups, Divisions, Subdivisions, Institutes, Boards, Standing and Special Committee, Task Forces, and Programs. Organized within the Council of Engineering, they are a major force in accomplishing the Society's stated purpose of advancing the art, science and practice of mechanical engineering.

ASME has 38 Technical Divisions to cater to a wide range of engineering specialties. Technical activities such as technical conferences, workshops and publications are often organized and produced by these divisions. ASME's involvement in codes and standards (some 600 of them) is well-established, promoting safety, reliability, productivity and efficiency in industry and daily life.

The ASME Singapore Chapter was officially registered as a society in Singapore in 1991, although it was granted Chapter status by ASME since 1990 after it obtained more than the required number of 75 member signatures for its petition. Beginning modestly as a means for members to gather in technical meetings, the chapter has gone on to conduct short course in areas of ASME’s strengths, such as pressure vessels and piping, produced a regular newsletter and a revenue generating yearbook cum member’s directory. It has started joint organization of conferences with some ASME technical divisions and is exploring new avenues of cooperation with other international and local societies. The name was changed to Singapore Section in February 1997 to be in line with the Sections in North America.

From an initial membership of less than 100 members, the Section now has close to 400 senior members and about 200 student members in its rolls. In 1993, the Section received the Outstanding International Chapter Award, for its strong membership growth and range of activities. Since then it has consistently been ranked amongst the most active international sections. In 1995, the Section again successfully petitioned for the formation of the first Student Section outside North America at the Nanyang Technological University. This was followed by the National University of Singapore Student Section in 1997. Recognizing the need for a proper transition from student membership to the senior ranks, as well as to ensure a steady pool of future leaders for the Section, a Young Engineers Committee was formed in December 1998.

In September 1997, the Section hosted the inaugural meeting for Region XIII, where leaders from the international sections gathered to recognize their status as a new ASME region and formed the first operating board. Concurrently it held the first joint conference with the Petroleum Division and International Gas Turbine Institute, ASME ASIA ’97. In January 2000, it again played host to the 3rd Asia-Pacific sub-Region operating board meeting.

For other news on the Section, refer to the on-line Newsletters of the Section.
Do it once and Do it Right

James, That should give me the 11 years 4 months ago #4653

  • Anton
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James,

That should give me the ammo I need.

Thanks for the quick response.
- If you're the smartest person in the room ... you're in the wrong room.

Anton, If I could lend my 11 years 4 months ago #4654

  • 2ndMoment
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Anton,

If I could lend my 2 cents worth too. In South Africa we suffer much the same problem. Historically (the last 35 years or so), many of the construction companies aligned themselves with British Standards. Now this was arguably a vestige of commonwealth influence.

These days, however, globalisation has been led by North America. Euroland and Britain have, in my opinion, languished in maintaining and updating their home grown codes and standards. This has allowed ASME preferences to fill the void and spread.

The ASME committies are far more active in management of their codes. P&G projects worldwide have a strong bias towards API (NORSOK being a notable exception) and API do have a strong relationship (on a negotiated basis ) with ASME. In addition, I have seen that any new modifcations to British codes (not just in piping and BPVC) actually reflect already-in-place ASME requirements which would suggest that they're in fact merely leveraging and adopting North American Standards. This is very clear when considering SIF's for stress analysis which are incorporated into just about all analysis programs. These SIF factors come from empirical studies and are imbedded in ASME Pressure Piping.

I'm continually asked exactly the same question. My answer is either that ASME is the worlds most widely accepted code of practice or (rather cheeky) "fine, propose a better option...". James is right in that it should be a client specified criteria. If the owner has no opinion or there's no regulatory requirement then it's really at the discretion (by this it really is personal preferance) of the piping team. This should be immediately incorporated into your project's piping design criteria and SIGNED OFF!

as a last note...

How many online discussion groups and topics exist for codes other than ASME
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